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Old St. Rose of Lima

St. Rose of Lima’s third location, consecrated in 1910, stayed open until 1992, though its roots go back to 1884. Its closure was part of the greater consolidation of Catholic parishes in the West End in the last half of the Twentieth Century.

Regardless, it is a beautiful example of “pure” Romanesque Revival architecture, with hulking, rusticated masonry that gives the church a Teutonic solidity.

The area is now largely served by “New” St. Augustine’s in the Hamilton Heights neighborhood.

7 Comments

  1. Do you have any pictures of the old Saint Rose School on Goodfellow and Ethel 63112. I graduated from
    Saint Rose in 1955

    • Unfortunately, the main St. Rose school building was torn down sometime before 1989, and only the old house on Goodfellow and the low stone retaining wall remains. There are some public housing buildings standing on the site now.

  2. Didn’t the old Saint Rose of Lima School @ Goodfellow and Etzel burn to the ground? Do you know if the convent still stands? Does the rectory next to the church belong to the Saint Louis Archdiocese?

    • I am not sure. What is the address of the former convent? The building just to the north of the church on Goodfellow is still owned by the Archdiocese–was that the old rectory? Apparently it is now the office of Catholic Charities. Also, it looks like the original St. Rose’s was at the corner of Etzel and Goodfellow (before the large stone church was built down at Maple and Goodfellow) on the grounds of the school, and was a wood-frame church with a stone tower. Do you remember that structure, or had it been demolished by the time you attended school there?

  3. Actually, The first saint Rose Church was built on the grounds that is now Saint Augustine (originally Saint Barbara’s). Long ago the wooden church burned (long before my time). Secondly, the church was built on the grounds that later became Saint Rose School. The convent was on Goodfellow, next to the school. As you know, Saint Rose Church ( building now standing but not belonging to the Archdiocese) was the third Saint Rose Church building. Interesting history but lost documents and pictures. It’s a shame

    • Was the convent that large building that looks like a mansion that sits practically on top of the old school property?

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