Pomegranate Temple, Benton Park West

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Old North, Link, Sunset Memorial Park 416

This building clearly functioned at one point at a Freemason’s Lodge, but I cannot find any information on its current status. I believe it is now a church. The pomegranate reference alludes to the capitals of the two huge columns outside of Solomon’s Temple in Jerusalem, named Jachin and Boaz, respectively. Solomon’s Temple of course features prominently in Freemason imagery.

Old North, Link, Sunset Memorial Park 418
 

6 Responses

  1. Tom Bartholow

    07/10/2014, 08:14 am

    BeauxArts? I would not have said that. It looks to me more like a rather vestigial sort of Greek Revival building.

    Reply
    • Chris Naffziger

      07/11/2014, 03:11 pm

      Tom, I would agree that there are strong Greek Revival elements, but for me the definition of Beaux-Arts is a combining of Renaissance and Classical elements. This building shows an understanding of Renaissance architecture in its massing and fenestration that is not Greek in origin. It’s definitely more of an art than a science when it comes to identifying architectural styles–and certainly room for varying opinions.

      Reply
      • Tom Bartholow

        07/12/2014, 03:59 am

        Yeah, the odd bulk of the building: that’s in your favor for Beaux-Arts. I just think that if somebody said let’s meet at that Beaux-Arts building, I’d keep driving past this one looking for it. On the other hand if somebody said let’s meet at the weird Palladian / Greek Revival bureau /cum/ funeral home, I’d make a beeline for it. In any case, jeez — what an odd looking thing; is there some sort of Masonic harmony that’s supposed to account for it? And I can’t believe I’ve never seen it before. Or noticed it. I’m going to be on the lookout next time I’m that way. Thanks for pointing it out.

        Reply
      • Tom Bartholow

        07/12/2014, 04:05 am

        Looking at it again just now it reminds me of some of the funny little architectural follies you might see in Roman murals or Pompeiian ones, or in the margins of late Latin manuscripts.

        Reply

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