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Vanished Potential

This house once had neighbors. Then Interstate 44 came through, and annihilated this neighborhood. It’s taken decades, and a lot of hard work, to put it all back together. I’ll openly confess to using 44 all the time, but having lived in Washington, DC, where most of the inner city interstates were never built, I would gladly sit at a few more stoplights.

8 Comments

  1. “I’ll openly confess to using 44 all the time” – are you saying that one should feel ashamed or guilty of using public infrastructure we pay for without choice? While I am not in favor of the demolition that took place to construct these roadways from a theoretical standpoint I certainly am not prepared to avoid using them because of that reason alone.

  2. 270 is a complete route, 55,40,70 and 44 should have terminated there instead of vivisecting the city and destroying the street grid…

    • 270 is a complete route, 55,40,70 and 44 should have terminated there instead of vivisecting the city and destroying the street grid…clarify….coming from the west all these highways could have ended at their junction with 270….

  3. There is a problem with that. 40 was built long before the others. Then 70 in the late 50s. The others came along after 40 and 70 were completed.

  4. US40 was built before WWII; it ended at Brentwood Blvd. It was extended to meet with the pre-war road into Downtown, the “Red Feather Expressway” (which began at Skinker) in the late 1950s. I know it was open by ’57, when I was a junior at CBC. My best buddy’s home home in Richmond Heights was on Harter Ave. and faced a huge concrete wall from the “new” elevated 40. Harter itself was swallowed by the recent expansion of 40.

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