Howard Bend

Update:The 141 extension was built anyway, connecting to the Page Avenue Extension and Maryland Heights Expressway, and was completed in the summer of 2012. As of the summer of 2020, there has been no development in Howard Bend, and at the rate of commercial development due to the Coronavirus Pandemic, there probably will be none for a very long time.

The last great swath of undeveloped bottom land in St. Louis County is set to become history–at the hands of Maryland Heights. As the continued balkanization of St. Louis County tax revenues continues, the “city” apparently believed it had to compete with nearby Chesterfield Commons in the Gumbo Flats along Highway 40. Below, you can see why this new project in the Howard Bend area of Maryland Heights is now moving forward: the Page Avenue sprawl connector seen from the overpass of River Valley Road.

Why should preservationists care that the farmland of Howard Bend remain agricultural?

Firstly, it encourages local produce to be grown close to home, cutting down on shipping costs during the growing season since your tomatoes don’t have to come from Chile.

Secondly, the development is more of the same sprawl economic model that has currently pushed gas prices up over three dollars because America has created cities (for the first time in human history) where walking is next to impossible if not outright ridiculed.

On a more personal level, I love the Howard Bend area because of its beauty: fields of corn, tree covered bluffs in the distance, and the knowledge that this little bit of rural St. Louis County is right in the middle of the metropolitan area.

Oh and by the way, when the levee fails twenty years from now, your tax dollars will go to the reconstruction of development that never should have occurred in a flood plain. Whether you live in the city, Wentzville, Collinsville or even Seattle, you should be angry that the government is insuring businesses and municipalities who built in an irresponsible manner.

There is history down here still as well, as you can still see the Howard Bend Pumping Station, where much of the City of St. Louis draws its water from the Missouri River. See an overhead view here, and also read here how residents are trying to stop this abomination.

4 Comments Add yours

  1. Fantastic pictures and words so true. I was at the brutal city council meeting Tuesday, where the re-zoning was approved. I am devastated, as are my neighbors. We have a website at http://www.riverbendcommunity.org and would love to use your images and words on our site — may we do this? Thank you.

  2. Chris says:

    Brigitte,Yes, you are more than welcome to use my pictures and commentary. My real name is Chris Naffziger, and you can contact me at naffziger[at]gmail.com.Chris

  3. Anonymous says:

    Let’s not loose our hope, we have many that still believe in a balanced planet! Stop the waste!

  4. I know this area very well. I used to work at Page and 170 when I lived in St. Charles. Sprawl is a virulent plague.

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