West Side of Francis Park, St. Louis Hills

South Jefferson and St. Louis Hills 018

I don’t get down to the Southwest corner of St. Louis very often; I tend to stay inside Grand Boulevard. But when I do get down this way, I’m always blown away by the inventiveness and creativity of the architecture. St. Louis Hills (a single neighborhood that is often conflated to refer to half a dozen neighborhoods southwest of Kingshighway and Arsenal) represents the best of St. Louis’s most stable areas. Francis Park, a large swath of green space, sits right in the middle of it. Today, and the following days, we’ll touch on one side of the park at a time. Each are different; the west side is mainly large, single family houses in a variety of styles.

South Jefferson and St. Louis Hills 019 South Jefferson and St. Louis Hills 020 South Jefferson and St. Louis Hills 021 South Jefferson and St. Louis Hills 022 South Jefferson and St. Louis Hills 023 South Jefferson and St. Louis Hills 024 South Jefferson and St. Louis Hills 025 South Jefferson and St. Louis Hills 026 South Jefferson and St. Louis Hills 027

Nottingham School sits at the northern edge of the west side of the park; it’s sort of Art-Deco in style, with some Modernist influences. The mosaics are interesting.

South Jefferson and St. Louis Hills 028 South Jefferson and St. Louis Hills 029

4 Comments Add yours

  1. Yojimbo says:

    Thanks, Chris. How would one classify the architecture or building style of the two homes in shot 3 and shots 7 and 8?

    1. Chris Naffziger says:

      Crap, I was afraid someone would ask! I would say a modern version of Tudor Revival, and also what I call “Gingerbread.”

      1. Yojimbo says:

        I was thinking Tudor Revival as well — the turreted entryways, the exposed exterior beam-and-plaster. But there’s also something Medieval, quasi-Gothic about them — the leaded glass, the keystoned, stone arches of the doorways and loggia, etc.

        And aren’t there also some Morris/Arts-and-Crafts gestures — the heavily browed gables, the narrow casement windows, and the generally cottage-y feel of the structures, despite their grandness. Which makes them charming, as opposed to imposing.

        1. Chris Naffziger says:

          I could see that, definitely.

Leave a Reply to Chris Naffziger Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.