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Abandonment and History

Update: I have no idea where this farm is, or its current status.

I came across this abandoned farmstead in the west central portion of Wildwood; the barn is starting to deteriorate and has collapsed on one side.

A simple house nearby sits empty.  I often remark that while the population of Wildwood is higher now than a century ago, there are certain places where the population is actually lower, as settlement patterns change and ebb and flow.

Update: The building below, whether or not it ever functioned as a school, definitely first served as the home of Bethel Methodist Church, now located in a Gothic Revival structure on Old Manchester Road, also in Wildwood.

This abandoned schoolhouse, which seems to be stable, sits empty and unused.  Does anyone else see the creepy doll hanging in the upstairs window?

9 Comments

  1. The creepy doll looks to me like a Christmas tree-topper angel. Still a little creepy.

  2. I am very interested in seeing this spot. i do urbexing with friends. you can see some of my pics on my flickr look up “teywue” There are alot of photos so it might take a little bit to find pics.

    • Not sure if I remember exactly; it was in Wildwood way out on the western edge for all of them.

  3. do you know what area of the western wildwood area it was near? (streets or anything) These seem like spots I would love to visit and explore

    • Wild Horse Creek Road, get on it on the southern end or northeastern end and start driving…

  4. The schoolhouse is actually the original Bethel Methodist Church. Construction was completed in 1859. The church was a circuit church on the Meramec Methodist circuit. It was built on land the church never owned. The land was purchased in 1866 by Frederick Solf who refused to sell. They moved to a temporary lob church on another portion of Wild Horse Creek Rd. The congregation still worships at a church built in 1875 at 17500 Manchester Rd. The original church was sold to Dorothy Steines in 1876. It was used as a residence as evidenced by an interior remodel that included a wall and a partial second floor. Later it was used for storage. I know the current owner and he plans to restore the church. The stone walls are 2′ thick. If you stand in front of the church in the winter time and look across Wild Horse Creek Rd you can see where the rock was quarried.

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