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Armour Meat Packing Plant, Fall 2012

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Boy, the new road that cuts dangerously close to the old Armour Meat Packing Plant makes it a lot easier to shoot pictures of it.

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Even just last winter, the old road had not been replaced yet.

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I’m not sure, but it looks like there’s been more collapse on the northern side of the building.

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I call the stairs below the Stairs to Nowhere.

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With the recent demolition of the Hunter Meat Packing Plant’s smokestack, the number of smokestacks from the old stockyards has dwindled to two.

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Update: Demolished in the spring and summer of 2016.

3 Comments

  1. I HAVE SEEN PHOTOS OF ARMOUR AND SWIFT MEATPACKING PLANTS FROM CITIES ALL OVER AMERICA FROM DALLAS TO STATESBORO GEORGIA. THE FACTORIES WERE ALL BUILT FROM THE SAME PLANS RIGHT DOWN TO THE NAMING OF THE AVENUE ND STREETS. THERE WAS ALWAYS AN EXCHANGE AVENUE AND PACKERS WAY ETC…

    • Terry, I have also noticed how they named the streets the same; I guess from a corporate standpoint it was smart, wasn’t it?

  2. Amazing how things have changed: there was meat packing and stockyards at every major city because you could move the animals alive easier and cheaper than “processed”, and I suppose cheap refrigeration and transportation caused all this to move out of the cities to central locations in rural areas. Same as hotels and shopping: they were concentrated in the downtown areas so one could walk, like fromt he train station to the hotel, or to work and to shopping areas, then home. Maybe there was a trolley or some similar transportation if you were lucky. Cheap transportation changed all this, also.

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