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The Last of Its Kind, Samuel Shepard Drive

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This little guy is the last of what was originally five row houses, perhaps only saved because it used its stout neighbors for support.

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But it gets even more exciting on the side, where obvious signs of the neighboring house are preserved in brick.

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Fire places and floor joist holes are filled in with brick, probably during demolition.

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The settling is causing the brick “plugs” to pop out.

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And look at that, you can see coal soot still stuck to the walls of the chimney flue.

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We’re not sure, but it looks like the right side of the first floor window is actually preserved here, below.

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In the back, on the side of the half-flounder service wing, remnants of the back porch and stairs still exists.

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One Comment

  1. They also used the wrong brick and mortar for the repairs, which is not helping. Modern concrete-based mortars and old brick are a bad combination that will destroy the old brick in time. Between that, the water infiltration, and the settling, and you get a wall that looks like this one.

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